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20121001
20121031
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SFGTV2 45
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Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)
chris highland. shortly thereafter chris stevens sat down next to me. the three of us went to lunch afterwards and became friends from that day forward. chris never tried to be someone special but he was someone special. when we were at hastings his charm and wit were on display from the start. in class he was very articulate and seemed as later in life always very poised and well spoken and at ease. i think our professors loved him. he liked being a student, even studying at the national war college a few years ago. he always seemed to genuinely enjoying studying and debating and was immersed in classes and activities of the school. particularly the hastings law journal, where he became managing editor. he very much liked the art of argument and trial law. he used to go to the courts nearby to watch very high profile trials and legendary judges and litigators. while he spent lots of times on the hastings campus, whether in library or out on what is called the beach in front of the school, he also liked to get off-campus and would often go for a run across golden gate bridge or play
in history from the stevens family. i will never forget what a great experience it was to live with those two guys. moving on to his study habits, everyone knew how brilliant he was, an enlightened manner. he was truly the smartest man in the room but never comported himself that way. he was confident and outgoing. never arrogant. always self-effacing, quick with a laugh or grin. always looking for ways to learn something from everyone else around him. he was no surprise considering chris came from such good stock. chris studied western civilizations and immerses himselfs in cultures and languages and took multiple trips to study abroad in spain, italy, morocco. perhaps most importantly chris knew how to relax and enjoy the moment. when i would periodically freak out about my course work or some o ther problem i thought i had he would make me stop and take a break, play a game of back gammon on the balcony and enjoy the view. it was an early lesson in the zenlike mindfulness of chris. no wonder he exceled in such a challenging and stressful career. i don't want you to think chris was perfect.
in saluting ambassador chris stevens who will be remembered for his strong sense of dignity, his humility and his generous service to others. he will be truly missed by all who loved him and by all he served throughout the magnitude of his life's work. thank you for this honor. [applause] >>> members of christopher stevens family, ladies and gentlemen, let me first thank chris stevens' brothers and sisters for their warm and delightful insights into what he was really like. thank you so much. that was fantastic what you did for us. christopher stevens was obviously an extraordinary human being and contributor. every year at stanford we have a group of what we call national security fellows come. they were roughly army, navy, air force, state department. a couple weeks ago we had a meeting and the first person i called on was an army colonel. i said where were you last? he said in libya. i said did you know christopher stevens? he said everybody knew christopher stevens. he was our leader, fluent in arabic, constructive, positive, doing something, he was our leader. this spontaneous practi
>>> my name is chris stevens, i'm the new u.s. ambassador to libya. i had the honor to serve as the envoy to the libyan revolution and i was thrilled to watch the libyan people stand up and demand their rights. now i'm excited to return to libya to continue the great work we've started, building a solid partnership between the united states and libya to help you the libyan people achieve your goals. right now i'm in washington, preparing for my assignment. as i walk around the monuments and memorials commemorating the courageous men and women that made america what it is, i'm reminded we too went through challenging periods, when america was divided by a bitter civil war 150 years ago. president abraham lincoln had the vision to pull us together toward a shared goal of peace and prosperity. growing up in california i didn't know much about the arab world. then after graduating from the university of california at berkeley, i traveled to north africa as peace corps engineer. i worked as an english teacher in morocco two years and quickly grew to love this part of the world. si
that custom. so my big brother, my best friend, i will see you next time. >>> i'm hill ri stevens, or as my family calls me h.i. i was born when he was 20. mine were not related to diplomacy. as a toddler he would send me on missions, which i was a willing accomplice. he sent me to stick carrots up my younger brothers nose as he slept in on christmas morning. that was really fun. growing up i was always able to brag that i had a brother in a foreign country. i got to visit him in these places. we road camels around pyramids in egypt, bathed in tunisia, snorkled in sinai and danced in israeli discos. in libya i played tennis with the daughter of his libyan tennis coach, learned about medical school in libya and jogged through the ruins. but, as we said, chris always came home and entertained us when he did. i worked hard to sharpen tennis and skiiing skills. i was proud the year chris said you ski faster than the master. [ laughter] >> we got up early to be the first on the ski lift. at my wedding he said he would be happy by to perform a libyan liberation dance to celebrate the success of
i knew i didn't have the second book. steven's story, i asked myself questions. a lot of writers do that that's usually how i begin. what did he do? who did he meet when he got off the train? who was this man servant? what was his life about? it all began with the seeds and the particular questions, as simple as that. although, then, i had to answer them. what i had done is i usual low don't work with an out line. a lot of writers do they will out line what will happen and sometimes they have to because like if you are writing a mystery you need to write out the plot. i write about characters the characters drive the story. when that hatched i sat down and said, what happens is, a, he arrived and gets off the train what's going to happen. >> i know z, he would get on the train and leave at the evented book. i didn't know the alphabet in between. i was nervous and i took one step at a time very japanese like. i began to study and read everything i could find on the japanese culture. the incredible thing was not having everything that went into it and it still became a quiet book. th
. >> edie ortiz, bill moundsy, steven hemnay -- nomnay and amara. >> good evening. thank you for nothing. you give cab drivers absolutely nothing. you take away, take away. we serve the city just like muni drivers serve the city but you don't care about us. i -- just like the lady who got reward. i come in all the time. nobody gives me awards. listen. i've lived in the city for 42 years. i've been a cab driver for 23 of those years. is that it? you disgust me, the way you do this one minute. you are unbelievable. you are so right wing conservative. this is a city of harry bridges. this is a liberal city. not a conservative city, where you give cabs to the cab 9 i been on the list 17 years. i get nothing. you give away our rights. you give away our rights and our lives. i have wasted my life. i have given up -- i have given up -- >> chairman nolan: next speaker. >> steven heimnay. security. >> i have. steven heimnay -- >> with all due respect to you guys giving us a minute you're getting paid to be mere. my cab that you just issued a new medallion for is in the garage so i can give you mo
to be in that situation to write this particular book because that was the situation that the character steven was in. he was in a place he didn't want to be. he was far from people he wanted to be close to. he was not in his territory. that's how i felt writing by myself, far from home, not wanting to do it everyday from the time i got up to the time i got drunk but i did. and the second half was written all in a month. and it worked for this book. i can't say it might work for every other book it probably wouldn't work for any other book. i started this book in third person and thought for sure as a young man's voice in first person. i went in third person and i was 5 pages in and said, this doesn't sound right or read right, something's wrong. i went back because i learned from my first book, you have to think about voice and where it's coming from. i went back and put it in first person and realized it started to work. what i did was put it in the journal entries and it became what i should have known from the beginning because a began my colleges career as a film major wanting to make films not know
, president of united way bay area to come up and say a few words. >> thank you steven. this is a really great celebration want congratulations to you and congratulations to west field and congratulations to the city and congratulations to all your teammates who are here that have great jobs with a great company and as the united way target is a partner not just here in the bay area but all across this country. target teammates participate in the community and with many nonprofits and last year teammates give over $15 million to the local united ways and that is no exception here in the bay area. we value the partnership greatly. congratulations on 50 years. the bay year is celebrating 90 years this year so we have been partners all those years and the tradition conditions. mr. mayor speaking of partnerships one partnership that we were all a part of that you make didn't think is the summer jobs plus initiative. target joined by more than 100 companies with mayor lee to launch that program here in san francisco and one more example when we put out the call to employers who will parti
. please join me and give a hand for jay primus, george reynolds, steven lee, and lorraine fuqua. >> thank you. this is a tremendous honor. it really does feel fabulous to be recognized. one of the relief fund things about this project is that it is just complex enough and just big enough that it is truly a case where hundreds of people were required to really get it off the ground. there's really nothing -- that's the kind of thing we dream about. working shoulder to shoulder with that many people to make something happen. it has never happened before. what a pleasure. unfortunately, the mfac award is limited to four people. we are up here representing an entire team. some of that court team is here tonight, including lauren, alex, lisa foster, hank wilson, lesley, jason lee, and brendan monaghan. [applause] those are some of the folks -- those are just some of the folks that really made sfpark happen. i hope you have a chance tonight to meet and congratulate them. these incredibly dedicated, hard-working people. i also want to especially acknowledged the tma'mta's cfo. [applause] without
was another accomplishment. president obama's cabinets has dr. steven chu. the very first asian-american -- as ambassador to the republic of china. we have a lot of accomplishments. it was not that accident, my friends. everyone of you know that you work hard. all these things are done on purpose. i want to let you know that we also can boast twice as many asian-americans on federal benches. those of us to understand the impact of the supreme court and what it can do or on june, we know that having asian-americans on the federal bench is a line up for appointments to the supreme court. thank you very much for this opportunity. i want to say that silicon valley is the birthplace of high-tech. silicon valley is the birthplace of norm. five minutes? thank you very much. [applause] >> thank you, congressmen. we would have extended the five minutes if we got a karaoke's song. >> this event would have not been possible by the financial contributions of our sponsors. we want to thank chevron corp., wells fargo, mcdonald's, academy of arts university, at&t, southwest airlines. if you ha
and all of the staff members from ucsf from their collaboration and particularly to claudia, and steven. speaking of partnerships i would like to call your attention to one of our strongest partnership and that is the bridge to success program. and that is a partnership between the city and county of san francisco, the department of children, youth and families, san francisco unified school districts, city college, and san francisco state university. you will see available out in the foyer, some information regarding this partnership. and the goals of this partnership are actually very simple. the goal is that we want to create a strong college and career pathway that is pre-k through post secondary in our city. the brochure is available for your information and it will highlight the work and activitis that happens, including a college fair that happens every year, parties for incoming freshman and i want you to know that the last registration party that we held at three different sites enroll for the classes. for more information visit www.bridgetosuccess.org. i want to want marine kar
had tailored two of the characters for steven anthony jones and gregry wallace. it's interesting that gregory wallace, an african american man, was supposed to play mr. oge, an excentric neisei who likes literature. i thought it would be an interesting thing to do. but after a while we did a reading and we realized as good an actor as gregory is, it was pushing his limits for him to play a japanese american character in the late 40's. >> i imagine him as being much older. >> in the course of writing the play and using various actors, he became younger. this chinese actor is more like a character in his mid to late 30's, excentric, a career bachelor who is into russian literature and who fashions himself kind of patterned after the japanese artists of the 30's and 40's. he has round sort of glasses and a braid. but getting back to the question of creating characters, for example african american characters, i'm also caution -- i had written another play called johann that was about an african american gi and a japanese wife that got married in post war japan. i wrote that play 20
steven fong here who was then the chair of the board of trustees. he said, you know, we ran into some problem with the chinese hospital. and our board would like to talk to you. so i said, well, i'm at work, you know? after 5:00 i will meet you at uncles for coffee. and so i met at uncle with him and several board members, and also a physician who is not here today and i wish i had remembered to bring him out, dr. roland low. >> so they told me that the state health, you know, services have are going to shut them down and that was a friday. and by tuesday, they have to relocate all of the patients because this hospital building does not conform to the fire code of those days. and i said what? he says, our doorway is too narrow. our staircase is too narrow. and because they have sent notices to the administrator and who said he couldn't fix it, so he neglected it, but any way, the end of the story was they had five working days to move and shut the hospital. and what could be done about it? i said, shutting the hospital? and i said, who told you that? and so they gave me all of the pap
heroes, pat park and steven rumble. [ applause ] >> thank you, so much, jen. and it is such an incredible honor to be here. thank you for america for hosting us, thank you for being an active inspiration, here for us and to the program. which we will talk more about today which was found in large part by... and thank you for getting the whole... chief information officer and mayor it is a huge honor to be in your presence as well. >> thank you so much for coming. >> thank you. >> and thank you all for taking time out of your busy schedules to come here today. we are here for a work session. we are actually going to go deep on which... and get your thoughts. so here is actually what is going to happen for the next couple of hours or so. we are going to have a brief context and then we will hear mayor lee make an exciting announcement. which i will introduce the projects and we will do... and break out into session and go deep and provide feedback. i need it and come back together for a... session. so,... talk about something called the... which is really an un
stevens, president of the academy of art university. in the 33 year history of the campus, classes have been housed in over 30 different locations. we are very happy and proud to finally have a permanent home and a beautiful modern facility to train the future generations of students. this has been a 40-year journey for the community. some of you have been with us from the start. today we join together the community, the faculty, the students, the staff, the business community and our neighbors and friends to start a new chapter in our history. we'd like to introduce john miso, president of our board of trustees. he has been with us for the last few years helping us with this project. he chairs the information committee that watches over this project, including our higher goals. >> trustee riso >> thank you. so how is everybody doing today? i thought so. you know, the opening of a new education facility is always a wonderful experience. a new facility dedicated to serving students as is city college. this particular educational facility, though, has a long history and struggle, a
guy. >> >> thank you. >> thank you. >> next speaker please. >> good afternoon. i am steven cornell and i own a hardware store two and a half blocks where this place is. what bothers me as a business person and there for seven years and got a permit and maybe they're not doing what they're supposed to but nobody stopped them after all this time and putting money into the business and doing different stuff and possibly closed for something that is going on that nobody ever called them on that's pretty tough after making all that kind of investment. i have been on the street. i actually went to elementary school a block and a half from there so if we're going to talk about longevity i have quite a bit of it. the street has changed a lot and to the better but the idea of closing a business or changing a business and letting it run for seven years that's not fair to any business. thank you. >> good afternoon commissioners. i steffen and for the last nine months i have been helping liam in his outreach to the community instructing him individually to knock on doors, talk to all rele
corrupting tactics before you cause another tragedy or death, like brian stow or steven martin. thank you. >> is there any additional public comment? >> with that, commissioners, we can move forward on your calendar. we will go back to item 2. 2012.0453c for 1414 van ness avenue. >> good afternoon, president fong and members of the planning commission. sharon young, planning department staff. the item before you is a request for conditional use authorization to allow change of use of existing ground fork retail space to institutional. allow proposed institution miami at san francisco campus from its current location at 415 jackson to 1414 van ness avenue, moving to rc4, zoning district, 130b height and bulk district and van ness special use district in van ness on the multiuse district. founded in 1993 miami ad school provides post secondary education that prepares students for careers in advertising. the abbreviated institution master plan for miami ad school was presented as an information item under case 2012.0453i and to the planning commission at a june 21st hearing. miami ad school
them off. that's all. thank you for listening. >> chairman nolan: next speaker please. >> steven zavtoski, terry and ms. doyle. >> thank you for the time and opportunity to speak to you, i am a professor at the universities of san francisco in environmental studies and i serve as sustainability director at college of arts and sciences. in that capacity one of the projects i've been spearheading is to improve infrastructure amenities for bicyclists on our campus. we're seen the number of bicyclists grow and we feel we can increase that growth even more. it will help us meet some of our goals. we have a parking crunch around our campus. it will also help us meet the city's goal of of 20% by 2020. we did a survey last fall and we found when asked why people chose not to ride their bike to campus there were three primary reasons. first was theft, concerned about bikes being stolen. we will build covered secured parking on campus. second was safety, fear of riding in city traffic, especially -- on fell and oak, the major arteries that people have to ride or cross to get to campus. the
. when i stopped trading i became more deeply involved in that district. i was elected to the st. stevens school board and was also appointed to the board of directors at the stones town ymca. i coached youth sports at the y and i also fund raised for both organizations. later fund raised for sacred heart where my son went to school and st. ignatius where my daughter went to school. my son is in the police department and my daughter works in the tech industry. my wife and i are very proud of both of them. i served on my homeowners association as delegate to the western twin peaks western counsel and worked to prevent stones town project which would have altered the character of our neighborhood. i fought to get two stop signs on eucalyptus drive. i waged an eight year battle to get playground equipment. i negotiated with loyal high school to -- a building pr project in our neighborhood. in 2001 i was appointed to the board of supervisors to the ethics commission and elected president by my fellow commissioners. in 2004 mayor newsome appointed me to the board of appeals and i served two t
Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)